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The GW Hatchet

AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

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Crime log: Subject barred after shoplifting at bookstore
By Max Porter, Contributing News Editor • February 26, 2024

News Briefs

GW partners with National Symphony Orchestra

GW will present the National Symphony Orchestra’s fall concert Oct. 17 at Lisner Auditorium, which will honor Duke Ellington’s 100th birthday year.

Ellington, who was born in D.C., was “an influential and popular bandleader, composer and pianist from the 1920s until his death in 1974,” according to a University press release. His work ranged from jazz to symphony to liturgical scores.

The National Symphony Orchestra will perform Ellington’s “Harlem” and “New World A-Comin’.” In addition, Robert Birch, adjunct assistant professor of trumpet and coordinator of Instrumental Studies, will offer audiences a performance of “Nightsongs” by Richard Peaslee.

The performance will be free and open to the public Oct. 17 at 7:30 p.m.

-Francesca Di Meglio

University to dedicate Kogan Plaza

Kogan Plaza, the open-event space within the Mid-Campus Quad, will be dedicated by its namesake, Barton H. Kogan, Oct. 15 at 11 a.m.

Kogan contributed $500,000 to GW’s Centuries Campaign to create the 50- by 90-foot space across from the Marvin Center and adjacent to Gelman Library, according to a University press release.

After retiring from his work in real estate, Kogan became involved in executive management of non-profit organizations, according to the press release. He focuses his time and resources on a variety of charitable organizations related to children, health and the Jewish community.

Kogan received his bachelor’s degree in business management in 1969 and a master’s degree in counseling in 1970. He is also an active alumnus of his fraternity, Kappa Sigma. Kogan will dedicate the plaza in honor of his family and future generations, according to the press release.

-Gayle Horwitz

GW, CBS collaborate on radio series with Walter Cronkite

GW and CBS News Radio are producing a series of 30, one-minute radio features, focusing on historical events of the 20th century, narrated by Walter Cronkite.

The segments will be broadcast on CBS’ 600 affiliates nationwide.

The news segments will focus on historical events and newsmakers of the 20th century, according to a University press release. While CBS is producing the series of segments, GW will fund the project.

“We are proud to be a part of this project,” GW President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg said, according to the press release. “Walter Cronkite’s unparalleled experience as a broadcaster makes him the ideal teacher as we look back on a remarkable century. We at GW share his enthusiasm for learning and discovery, and that’s why we’re involved.”

Cronkite’s “That’s the Way it Was” will run from early November until the end of 1999.

-Gayle Horwitz and Steven Postal

New Electronic Media head to hold screening

The new Electronic Media Program director is holding a screening of his original films Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Marvin Center Room 405.

The screening is also a chance for students to meet Professor David Liban. Five of his movies will be featured at the event, including Movie Cool, Friction, Kiss Off, Wet Noises and Hard Wired.

-Dustin Gouker

Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity returns to GW

Two representatives from the Sigma Phi Epsilon national fraternity will be on GW’s campus next week in an effort to recruit University students to join a newly established chapter at GW.

Sigma Phi Epsilon is the nation’s largest fraternity, with more than 13,000 members. The fraternity is on 258 college campuses and was formerly at GW, according to a press release.

The fraternity follows the Balanced Man Project, which eliminates pledging and one-time initiation. The leadership development program recruits men based on academic standards, campus and community involvement, athletic potential and a desire to help found the new chapter, according to a press release.

-Matt Berger

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