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AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

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Wine bar on 2200 Penn opens doors
By Ella Mitchell, Contributing News Editor • June 14, 2024

Two professors receive Guggenheim awards for innovative research

Two faculty members were named Guggenheim fellows last week, winning the prestigious grant to fund their individual research projects.

Sarah Wagner, an associate professor of anthropology, and Andrew Zimmerman, a professor of history and international affairs, both won the fellowship this year. The professors are two of 173 fellows who were chosen out of nearly 3,000 applicants from the U.S. and Canada.

Fellows are selected for exceptional research or creativity in the arts and winners receive grants of varying amounts, according to a release from the Guggenheim Foundation.

Wagner’s research focuses on finding and recovering victims of conflict and war. She studies the scientific, social and political process of repairing a community post-conflict.

The fellowship will fund Wagner’s third book, “Bringing Them Home: The Identification and Commemoration of Vietnam War MIAs,” which examines the effort to locate and memorialize American soldiers who went missing during the Vietnam War, according to the foundation’s website.

Her research will focus on attempts to find these soldiers and the political backdrop that shapes how the controversial conflict is remembered in the United States.

Zimmerman studies empires and revolutionary history in the U.S., West Africa and Europe. He researches historical perspectives that are not centered on Europe and elite, wealthy figures, according to the foundation’s website.

The fellowship will also fund Zimmerman’s third book, “Conjuring Freedom: A Global History of the American Civil War.” The book will offer a bottom-up account of the Civil War with a focus on transnationalism and what he argues was a grassroots revolution that helped the Union win the war, according to the website.

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