Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

NEWSLETTER
Sign up for our twice-weekly newsletter!

Three alumni join Board of Trustees
By Hannah Marr, News Editor • June 21, 2024

Dish of the week: Momofuku’s shiitake buns

 

Momofuku's shiitake sticky buns are filled with crispy mushrooms. The dish costs $11 at the D.C. location. Kevin Chen | Hatchet Photographer
Momofuku’s shiitake sticky buns are filled with crispy mushrooms. The dish costs $11 at the D.C. location. Kevin Chen | Hatchet Photographer

Updated: Oct. 7, 2016 at 12:10 a.m.

This post was written by Hatchet staff writer Max McCrory.

Everyone’s heard of Momofuku, whether they have actually dined there or just seen the elusive dining room through the windows of the Milk Bar – both located on I Street.

Momofuku is famous for its varieties of ramen, which incorporate many different flavors and inspire many an Instagram post. But Momofuku has some lesser-known but equally delicious dishes – especially the shiitake buns ($11).

The buns themselves in this underrated dish are warm and fluffy, and taking a bite feels like you’re chomping into a cloud. You could easily eat these airy buns bun without any filling, but you’d miss out on the savory shiitake mushrooms that provide the perfect filling.

The mushrooms are lightly fried, which gives them a bit of a crunch. It doesn’t hurt that the mushrooms are sautéed in Momofuku’s signature sweet and savory hoisin sauce. The mushrooms are also combined with scallions and cucumbers to add even more crunch and a dash of freshness to the dish. The buns and mushrooms come together perfectly to create a bite full of unique sensations and flavors.

Now you must be wondering, how do I try this tasty dish if Momofuku is constantly packed to capacity? Momofuku takes reservations, so be sure to book one in advance. Sometimes planning ahead is hard when you’re a busy college student, though. Luckily you can try a similar dish at other Asian restaurants around D.C., including Ping Pong Dim Sum and Sakuramen.

More to Discover
Donate to The GW Hatchet