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AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

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Crime log: Subject barred after shoplifting at bookstore
By Max Porter, Contributing News Editor • February 26, 2024

We tried guacamole with peas…and you may not want to

Guacamole with peas might be the biggest Internet trend, but for me, it was underwhelming. Eva Palmer | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Guacamole with peas might be the biggest Internet trend, but for me, it was underwhelming. Eva Palmer | Hatchet Staff Photographer
On Wednesday, the New York Times posted a recipe for a twist on a classic: guacamole with peas.

Almost immediately, politicians, journalists and other Twitter users posted their disgust for the recipe, and by the end of the day, President Barack Obama had tweeted that he was also “not buying peas and guac.”

I scoffed at the tweets. Was no one adventurous anymore? Does everyone really think peas are all that bad? And what happened to that famous saying, “Don’t knock it ’til you try it?”

Armed with a handful of avocados, peas and a food processor, I took to the kitchen to find out what all the fuss was about.

The Times’ recipe for a verdant guacamole remix was too complex for the average dorm-room kitchen. To prep, I had to broil a single jalapeño in the oven, zest a lime and finely mince scallions and cilantro. Using the food processor to blend together the peas and other ingredients was a far cry from the mix of salsa, lime juice and mashed avocados my freshman year roommates and I would use to make our own dip on the floor of our Thurston Hall room.

After mixing together the mashed avocados and pea mixture, I sat down with my green creation. The recipe called for the guacamole to be topped with a tablespoon of sunflower seeds, but the supermarket was out and my mom called the suggested garnish an “abomination.”

I dipped into the guacamole and was underwhelmed. The jalapeños gave the guacamole too much heat, and I could barely taste the peas. Because the recipe called for lime zest and lime juice, the guacamole was overpowered with citrus.

While I consider myself a guacamole lover, this take on a classic wasn’t worth the time I took broiling ingredients or digging through my kitchen to find the food processor. Sometimes, it’s OK not to mess with a good thing.

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