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AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

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FRESHFARM workers ratify union agreement
By Max Porter, Contributing News Editor • February 15, 2024

Long past the 90s, the Pixies still rule alt-rock

Pixie's hit 1999 album Where is My Mind? Photo used under the Creative Commons License.
Pixie’s hit 1999 album Where is My Mind? Photo used under the Creative Commons License.

This post was written by Hatchet reporter Jeanine Marie

The Pixies brought the 90s back to the Strathmore Sunday night.

“All I’m saying, pretty baby, la la love you don’t mean maybe,” crooned Pixies drummer Joey Santiago. Even with his white beard and cotton baseball cap, Santiago still melted his audience with the last words of their 1989 hit “La La Love You.”

Pixies played to a sold-out Strathmore Hall Sunday night, and their chemistry on stage would have put many other bands to shame. The show transported its audience back to an era sans Internet, when iPhones were the stuff of science fiction and real alternative rock ruled the airwaves.

The foursome tapped into this nostalgia with songs like the raucous “Crackity Jones” and the romantic “Velouria.” Lead singer Francis Black is an enchanting lyricist, and every generation of the audience swooned and sung his words with such ease, it seemed impossible that Pixies have hardly toured since a brief stint in 2004 after a amicable breakup in 1993.

Pixies catapulted the evening from awesome to epic with two more late ’80s hits, “Wave of Mutilation” and the well-known “Here Comes Your Man.” Though the Pixies’ album sales were always mediocre, the band is legendary for its influence on bands like Radiohead and The Strokes.

In a 1994 interview with “Rolling Stone”, Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain admitted he was “basically trying to rip off the Pixies” when he wrote the wildly popular “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” It is easy to see why Cobain did so: Pixies still rule alt-rock 20 years later.

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