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The GW Hatchet

AN INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER SERVING THE GW COMMUNITY SINCE 1904

The GW Hatchet

Serving the GW Community since 1904

The GW Hatchet

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Crime log: Subject barred after shoplifting at bookstore
By Max Porter, Contributing News Editor • February 26, 2024

Taste, smell of D.C. drinking water may change

A temporary change in the disinfectant used by the Washington Aqueduct may alter the taste and smell of D.C. drinking water starting this month, according to a news release from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The aqueduct will use chlorine as a water disinfectant through May 17 instead of the usual chloramines, according to the release. The temporary switch is “standard water treatment practice,” but may alter taste and smell of the water, according to the statement. Any change in color should be temporary.

Chloramine is a weaker but more stable disinfectant than chlorine, according to the Environmental Protection Agency Web site. Chlorine is used in short-term periods to help maintain higher water quality throughout the year, according to the Army Corps release.

Though the switch to chlorine can increase disinfection byproducts – may be associated with reproductive and long-term health effects, such as cancer – drinking water will be monitored to ensure it meets federal standards, according to the release.

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